Attitudes to War in Britain

izzykersley01
Mind Map by izzykersley01, updated more than 1 year ago
izzykersley01
Created by izzykersley01 about 6 years ago
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Attitudes to War in Britain
1 War - An Adventure?
1.1 1914 - enthusiasm for the war
1.2 Most people felt positive
1.2.1 "Fighting will be an adventure"
1.2.2 "It's right to fight for your country"
1.2.3 "It'll be over by Christmas. Britain will win easily"
2 Government Ignorance
2.1 Letters from soldiers were censored
2.2 Reporters rarely allowed to see battles
2.3 Newspapers censored from 1914
2.4 No photos containing dead soldiers
2.5 Casualty figures weren't available from the government
3 Attitudes Changed
3.1 As the war went on, people found out more
3.2 1500 civilians killed in bombing raids
3.3 No obvious successes on the Western Front up until 1918
3.4 The government could hide casualty figures, but not the deaths of family members or returning blind and crippled soldiers
3.5 Rationing was difficult and taxes increased - people became sick of it!
4 Propaganda
4.1 Encouraged men to fight e.g. 'Your Country Needs You'
4.2 Some aimed abroad to encourage US military involvement
4.3 September 1914 - War Propaganda Bureau produced pamphlets to encourage German-hatred
4.4 Ministry of Information produced films like 'the Battle of the Somme' (1916)
4.4.1 Very realistic - could have been seen as anti-war
4.5 1917 - National War Aims Committee tried to improve moral using speeches and literature
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